T.B.N Interviews: Andrea Warmington

Posted in T.B.N Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2016 by James Field


“Creativity is contagious, pass it on” -Albert Einstein

Greetings! Its been sometime since my last T.B.N feature with the Master Jeweler & Sculptor, Mr. Wallace Chan, and I felt that it was time for some new material!

Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Andrea Warmington, a very talented Creative Director in the Beauty & Fashion industries by way of London, England. She discusses her passion for creativity, design, art and how she achieved her dreams in the overly saturated melting pot that is Manhattan.

TBN: Let’s begin with your background, where did you grow up? When did you decide that moving to New York was something you wanted to do?

A.W: I grew up in London England, I came to New York to go to Art school, The School of Visual Arts. I was always into art and design. I loved drawing. My sister was going to Parsons in New York. I was really inspired by her doing what she loved, which was fashion designing. So I decided to apply to art school.

I didn’t think I would have a career in the arts. I was really into computer science in a strange way. I loved that aspect of writing code and getting into the technical side of the computer system. But I had a passion for art and acted upon it. After art school the first job I got was senior designer at Harper Collins, designing book covers. I must say I felt like I was in a dream the first 6 months. I was doing what I loved to do… Designing… Designing books. A book cover to me was like designing a mini poster. Loved the process and how every book cover tells a story, working with the typography illustrations, photography and just being experimental.I did that for a year and wanted to try something new.

I got hired at McCann Erickson as a junior art director working on L’Oreal. It was great, fast passed, and a new creative challenge, beauty advertising. I did that for a year and shortly after that worked for Condé Nast where I freelance for a few years, for Mademoiselle and then Vanity Fair magazines. I loved working there and it really allowed me to work on some fun special projects. I was working on project invites and advertorial pages, and it was always fresh and new. I stayed there for a few years.  I really was ready for a change. And change was working at Ericsson Fina, a beauty boutique ad agency which was a part of Grey New York. I worked on Covergirl as an Art Director to Creative Director where I worked on campaigns with Taylor Swift, Queen Latifah, and Janelle Monáe to mention a few. I worked with a number of amazing photographers and directors, models hair and makeup teams. I loved it!

Janelle Monae for Covergirl

TBN: What was your “Ah ha” moment? ( I borrowed this question from one my idols, Oprah) When did your calling speak to you?

A.W: I think that working at Ericsson Fina was a great “Ah Ha” moment because we pitched a beauty and hair campaign and we won the account. It was a great experience. We were a small creative team of say 8-10 and it was like working with your family. Really supportive, really creative and a good creative challenge.

TBN: As a Creative Director, is there a specific medium that you enjoy working in more than others such as photographic print campaigns vs. digital or television work? What’s the least favorite part of what you do, is there one?

A.W: I really love photography and film. I love the process of coming up with a creative campaign for a brand, the research and development and crafting of that campaign and then producing the final concept. I love the story telling aspect. I love how a photo alone can tell the story without words.

I love the idea of tapping into ones emotions…

I’m not sure if there’s a least favorite aspect of what I do. I have to think about that…

TBN: You work with what I assume to be large groups of talented individuals such as Photographers, Hairstylist’s, Makeup Artist, etc. Do you find it difficult to align on one common vision for a project?

A.W: I’ve worked with Pat McGrath an amazing British and Black makeup artist, Photographer Tom Munro, Micheal Tompson, Dan Jackson, some really amazing creative guys who have worked on some major editorial stories and advertising campaigns. I must say they are all so collaborative and creative. I love working with a team of experts who do what they do best, I have my vision, but it’s just the foundation. Working with a strong team is key and you must be flexible. I don’t like to work with drama queens because the end of the day we are all putting our names on the final product i.e ad campaign or editorial story.

TBN: Did you always envision that you would have a career in this field of work?

A.W: No… I really wanted to be a systems analyst. Can you believe that?!

TBN: This may be a bit of a touchy subject, but do you think that we’ve made collective progress in the availability of jobs within the Fashion Industry for people of color?

A.W: Wow… I’m black and was born in the UK. I remember working at Saatchi & Saatchi in the UK and I was the only black creative person in the building. I would say things have changed a lot over the years. I can talk for the beauty business which is somewhat similar to the fashion business. I do think I’ve had much opportunity to work in the Beauty business both here in the US and in Europe and Asia. It could be timing, but I feel blessed to have the opportunity to work were I’ve worked.


TBN: Where do you see your career trajectory within the next 3-5 years? What goals do have on your list, and what advice would you give to readers on how to pursue and manifest their own dreams?

A.W: James that’s a good question. I really love the creative field. I really would love to strive to create work that not only inspires and educates people in some way, but touches you emotionally and in a positive uplifting way. So I’m keeping it open so I can explore new opportunities that will allow me to do this. My new creative challenge now is working for a start up magazine that bridges all the experience I’ve gained over the years. This magazine is a celebrity lifestyle publication that gives you exclusive stories and keeps you current with beauty, fashion, trends, with a European twist. The magazine is in both Spanish and English. I was brought on to take this European Tabloid magazine to the next level in the US market. Check it out on a newsstand near you, Hola! (Made in the USA)

TBN: Lastly Andrea, how has this journey been for you thus far? What has been the most interesting part for you, and what has been the most challenging?

A.W: It’s been a great journey…

I think that things are changing in the industry. I started out in the industry where you were an expert in your field i.e: Beauty. Now it seems that we are all experts. The internet has changed the industry and how consumer are involved in the process. Now you can create your own Youtube commercial and have thousands of people watching it from all around the world… that’s pretty major. From online Youtube videos to digital magazines, Instagram, Facebook, these are all creative tools to express yourself.

Andrea Warmington

Main Site


I would like to give a big sincere thanks to Andrea for taking the time to chat with me for The Black Nouveau!

It has been a wonderful insight into the exciting world of Creative Art Direction.


Nouveau Spotlight: Sergio Wonder Fall/Winter 2016 Menswear Presentation

Posted in Nouveau Spotlight with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2016 by James Field

Last weekend in Brooklyn I experienced a wonderful presentation of menswear for Fall 2016, by a very special designer.

Mr. Sergio Wonder, my former design partner on the highly successful and innovative custom-made jewelry and accessories line  “Sergio + James” debuted his second consecutive clothing presentation among 5  other designers, in a showcase curated by our good friend Curtis Bryant.

Sergio’s aesthetic stems from his incredibly deep and complex love for Fashion, and the art of presentation on the human form. When we worked on the design concepts for Sergio + James, I was continuously awed and dazzled by his love of fabric selection, research, and of course the design process itself.

This collection showcased for Fall 2016 revealed both an expert attention to detail and a touch of urban sophistication in the form of tailored cotton bomber jackets with hand worked knit detailing, to tapered black & white cotton checked-pattered pants worn under a black knit tee topped off by a black cotton collar & button-less jacket.

Two of my favorite looks. Fifty Shades of Chic is the vibe here.

Two of my favorite looks. Fifty Shades of Chic was the vibe here.

The main idea presented in  Sergio’s collection is a simple concept of utility and wearability, so often lost in independent designers so set in the conviction of bold statement pieces to garner press. He achieves this soft yet modern take on classic looks with various pocket details, pleated shorts, and 4 pocket trousers that create a uniformity to the collection. The more whimsical pieces like the bomber jackets, grey knit and jersey sleeve crew neck pull overs and long sleeve black & white jumpsuit, with pleats are fresh and modern urban chic silhouettes that are right on par with the current “revolution” as its been described of new, different and exciting shapes in menswear.

Form & Function displayed in the balance menswear presentation at Sergio Wonder Fall 2016

Form & Function presented in the balance menswear presentation at Sergio Wonder Fall 2016.

This color scheme of mostly black, white, and grey is simple yet incredibly powerful in its ability to reveal Sergio’s tailoring skills. Custom hand worked jewelry to jumpsuits and bomber jackets, his talent has without a doubt sharpened with time and it was an honor to witness the wonderful expression of said skills.


The black cotton and knit zip bomber jacket that I absolutely fell in love with, paired with black cropped pants featuring a black side leg stripe.



Sergio with two of the shows models.


The entire presentation was quite poetic and fresh, and a well received display of tailoring, craftsmanship and passion by a very talented young artist.

Sergio’s collection was debuted during Brooklyn Fashion Week 2016, which seemed to magnetically attract a colorful and fabulously unique flock of artist, designers, makeup and hair stylists, musicians and the like to Bushwick last Saturday afternoon. There was even a reunion with one of our most passionate patrons to our former jewelry collection, Mr. Michael Ibidapo who wore his custom-made black & white, “Jo” necklaces backstage and posed for a photo with myself and Sergio.

James Field, Michael Ibidapo & Sergio Wonder, after the presentation of the Fall 2016 Menswear collection.

James Field, Michael Ibidapo & Sergio Wonder, after the presentation of the Fall 2016 Menswear collection.


Sergio Wonder’s collection of Ready to Wear is available exclusively at


Also be sure to follow him via his Tumblr page and on Instagram  and Snapchat at: SergioWndr


A special thanks and Congratulations to our good friend Curtis Bryant who curated the 6 show designer showcase, doing a wonderful job of getting such great talent together and it was a pleasure to see Sergio and everyone that attended for gathering of superb young talent.




ANAYI Fall 2015 Collection Campaign x OWN Magazine

Posted in Art Nouveau with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2015 by James Field

A few weeks ago my editor Kota from OWN Magazine flew in from Japan and asked my help with a photoshoot. As you may have read from my previous posts about Kota, we always have a great time and produce incredible work.

We shot on location in Long Island City, Queens in a really cool loft space full of antique French gilt mirrors, tufted antique settee’s and incredible light, not to mention some amazing hair and make up people, photgraphers and stylists. We shot the gorgeous Taylor Hill in the very chic Fall 2015 collection of the Japanese brand, Anayi.

The pieces have a classic, modern Chanel vibe with the tweeds suit seperates, day dresses, brooches and fur.

It was a fantastic (and very hot lol) day and I hope you enjoy the video.

I am actually standing on a ladder and sprinkling the white feathers on Taylor, so much fun!🙂

Model _ Taylor Hill
Art Director _ Kota Kuramoto
VP _ Ben Carey
Gaffer/Dolly Grip _ Austin Castelo
Assistant Camera _ Marcos Herrera
Production Assistant _ Michael Comito
Stylist _ Ayako Endo
Hair _ Kenshin Asano
Make _ Yasuo Yoshikawa
Video Editor _ Phillostory
Casting _ Mister Lee
Stylist Assistant _ Chihiro Ishikawa
Stylist Assistant _ Manami Jinbo
Assistant to Mr. Kota Kuramoto_ James Field
Client _ ANAYI anayi.com/

Special thanks: ANAYI, IMG models, L’atelier

Nouveau Spotlight: Two Dazzling Days of Fine Jewelry Inspiration

Posted in Nouveau Spotlight with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 26, 2015 by James Field

Hello darlings! Long time no post huh? I feel terrible that I have not written anything in a few months, so what better way to make me feel better that a jewelry post!

This past weekend I received press passes to attend the New York Antique and Fine Jewelry show at the Metropolitan Pavilion and the JANY Jewelry Trade show at the Jacob Javitz center. It was two days packed full of 18th century old mine cut diamonds the size of goose eggs, South Sea pearls, Brazilian and Colombian emeralds that looked like green pieces of candy and design inspiration all around.

This piece was the first to catch my eye. With its Indian influences featuring beautiful emeralds, freshwater pearls and diamonds sets in white gold it was a great way to kick off the show.

This piece was the first to catch my eye. With its Indian influences featuring beautiful emeralds, freshwater pearls and diamonds sets in white gold it was a great way to kick off the show.

The show began with a beautiful set of white gold tassel necklaces done with diamonds, smooth green emeralds and pearls. The shows themselves were very vast, filled with vendor upon vendor eager to present his treasure trove. One mistake I made was showing too much interest in a particular diamond feather brooch, upon after which I read the price tag of $15,000 I quickly walked away chuckling to myself lol.

A display featuring a glittering array of pieces with classic charm. My favorite is the Art Deco emerald and diamond brooch.

A display featuring a glittering array of pieces with classic charm. My favorite is the Art Deco emerald and diamond brooch by Harry Winston.

Harry Winston without a doubt is one of my favorite houses when I think of classic jewelry design. This display was filled with fabulous pieces including a few by Tiffany & Co.

This young girl looked amazing in this diamond and emerald necklace, I had to take a picture.

This young girl looked amazing in this diamond and emerald necklace, I had to take a picture.


As I walked along with my grandmother Ellen, I spotted this young girl wearing this fantastic emerald and diamond number. I immediately ran over and introduced myself and asked for a photo for my blog.

This Opal and diamond set was incredible!

This Opal and diamond set was incredible!

The shows was a fantastic way to spend the weekend, and such a inspiration boost for my collection. Stay tuned as I continue to work on samples hoping to launch a full line very, very soon🙂

Thankyou for reading as always!


Originalis Factory Video Shoot x OWN Magazine

Posted in Art Nouveau with tags , , , , , , on January 28, 2015 by James Field

Recently I assisted my editor at OWN Magazine, Kota Kuramoto on a really exciting and interesting video shoot for the Originalis Factory company. We always have such a blast when Kota is in town and I hope you guys enjoy what we came up with.

Client: Originalis Factory
Director: Kaname Hatano
Producer: Kota Kuramoto

Special thanks to the crew at Odin New York.



T.B.N Interviews: Wallace Chan

Posted in Nouveau Spotlight, T.B.N Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 15, 2014 by James Field


“My greatest enjoyment is to express emotions, wisdom of our ancestors and the greatness of Mother Nature through jewelry creation.” –Wallace Chan


I am honored and overjoyed to feature a fascinating and extremely inspiring interview that I conducted with Master Sculpture & Jeweler, Mr. Wallace Chan. We discuss his exceptional skill in jewelry design, his inspirations from nature and his outlook on life and creativity.



To begin I would like to formally welcome Master Sculpture & Jeweler Mr. Wallace Chan to The Black Nouveau, I am so honored to speak with you.

TBN: Since your debut as the first Asian designer at the 2012 Biennale des Antiquaires in Paris with the collection “Path to Enlightenment: Art & Zen” your work has been featured in countless publications and has been critically acclaimed as works of sculptural art.

Your style is a whimsical blend of naturalistic themes, fantastical motifs and exceptional craftsmanship, where do you draw inspiration from?

W.C: To create is to live fully, to absorb knowledge in all ways, and to practice repeatedly. The creating process can be described with two words, “life” and “understanding”.

Life is the key to creation, a vital element. Creation changes, and is full of vitality, it reflects the pulse of the heart and the spirit of the age, and motivates the development of history. Creation and life are interactive, for there to be creation, there must be life, and for life to have meanings, creativity is a must.

“Understanding” involves communication and channels. The creator must understand the skies, the earth and in between the two, human beings. It may sound a bit vague, but to put it in simple words, it means the creator should learn about the past, the present and the future, and he should dig into different kinds of knowledge e.g. astrology, geography, technology, history, psychology and philosophy etc.

As for inspiration, when you understand life and the universe, you will naturally understand that, there is humanity in everything, from a piece of wood to an elephant. When you treat them with emotions, they respond to you in the same way. Inspiration comes from the accumulation of our everyday experience. Like the herbal cabinet of the Chinese doctors, each little piece of our memories is stored in one little drawer, and when I see a gemstone, these pieces of memories come out from different drawers, they entwine, merge and transform with one another, and this interaction generates creativity.

I hope to re-interpret and enliven the elements of Mother Nature and culture through jewelry creation, and pass the wisdom of the skies, the earth and human beings on to the next generation. But to make it happen, solid and cultivated craftsmanship is crucial, from techniques to materials and tools, it is important to invent new ways in order to have our imagination actualized.

T.B.N: You have been credited as the creator of the “Wallace Cut” may I ask what this means, how did you come about designing it?

W.C: Why did I invent “Wallace Cut”?  One time I went to a photography exhibition, in one of the photographs I saw the images of a man overlapped.  They said it was a dark room technique called “multiple exposures”.  I wondered if I could achieve the same effect with carving.  I kept this piece of memory and the curiosity on my mind. When I finally started learning about gemstone cutting, I saw how the light entered the gemstone’s body through its surface, and how the light interacts intensively inside it.  This experience recalled my impression on “multiple exposure”, and since I had acquired the knowledge to carve and design with gemstones, I could try to realize my idea this time.

The Wallace Cut is a carving technique which creates an illusion in transparent materials by combining medieval 360-degree intaglio into 3-dimension engraving.  The resulting quintuple reflection unifies these features with precise calculation and angle casting and forms a 3-dimension and multi-line reflection.

The "Now and Always" necklace featuring a signature 35.4ct Wallace Cut aquamarine with the image of Horae the Greek Goddess of nature, with amethysts, diamonds, blue topaz, sapphires and opals.

The “Now and Always” necklace featuring a signature 35.4ct Wallace Cut aquamarine with the image of Horae the Greek Goddess of nature, with amethysts, diamonds, blue topaz, sapphires and opals.

The concept sounds simple, but the execution was near impossible.  Let’s take my “Horae” design as an example.  To get a full-bodied, 3-dimensional face for this work, I had to empty out precisely just such a face at the back.  First, I bored a tiny hole right in the center.  That’s the starting point, which is the nose.  Then I slowly widened the space from inside out.  As it was done in reverse, every drill was an act of reverse thinking: left is right, deep is shallow, and front is back.  Since the space inside is the face of the Goddess itself, there was no space to move around. But that’s how the image acquired multiple reflections, creating different angles of the face.  I carved the front view of the Goddess, and she would be looking at me sideways

Moreover, the tools that were available on the market were not sophisticated enough.  I had to make some of the tools specifically for this work.  I went to a factory and became an apprentice in order to learn about the mechanics it took to invent the tools. After six months in the factory, I found out that I could use the dentist’s tool for it.  But the drill rotated for 36,000 times per minute, which was too fast, and the heat it generated while carving would damage the stone.  At last I realized that I had to do the carving under water.  So here it went: I carved, I dried the stone, checked to see if it was alright, (because one tiny mistake would be reflected into four more mistakes, and the whole piece of work would be ruined,) and then I put it into water to carve again. It was a stroke by stroke process, I forgot how many hours I worked on each piece, but at the end I felt that my mind, my hand, and the tool were all working as one, it was my consciousness doing the carving. It was 1987, and it was one of the craziest carving periods in my life. I surrendered myself to the magic of light and shadow, and found great happiness in it.

I had to do a lot of calculations to determine where the center was – where exactly would the face be situated.  The next step was the amount of space for each half of the face; both sides have to be symmetrical.  Then there were the angles of the faceting on the periphery of the face in order to achieve the number of reflections that I wanted.   And even if the calculations were all correct, I still needed to put them through some trials before I committed them to the stone.  All in all, this piece took me two years to finish, not counting the years I spent in perfecting the 3-dimensional technique. Life was not easy during those two years, I had to earn a living, and at the same time keep inventing.

T.B.N: With your vast knowledge of Gemology, metallurgy and sculpture, what sort of obstacles do you encounter when designing a piece? You have been known to completely destroy pieces if they are not up to your standards, would you call yourself a perfectionist when it comes to your art?

W.C: Since I began my creative journey in 1973, I have gotten used to absorbing knowledge and techniques from all directions. The wisdom left to us by our ancestors benefits us throughout life, but no matter what we do, we must not depend it all on existing knowledge. We have to explore and pave new paths. We have to turn our world upside down. Upon the old foundation, we have to build something new for the development of our future.

Difficulty has an intimate relationship with creation. It nurtures creativity and through challenges we grow. Difficulty comes from everywhere, from tools to techniques, materials and our mentality. But as long as we can overcome our own desires, we know how to deal with difficulty without backing down, as well as without fear, anxiety and disgust. The path of creation is often lonely, but this lonesome feeling makes us strong and helps us persist. Creativity grows as a result. I feel that I have entered a fairyland every time I meet obstacles, and once I solve my problems, I go back on earth with a sense of satisfaction and joy that is beyond words.

I pursue perfection, but there is no perfection in this world, there is nothing you can call the highest, or the best. But this is the reason why there are limitless possibilities. As there is no limitation, I can pursue perfection without fear, I can try, I can fail, and there is no need to compromise. I am used to absorbing new knowledge with open arms and an open heart. I am always under pressure, and upon the existing pressure I pressure myself even more, to explore the depth and width of knowledge and work my mind out.

T.B.N: My absolute favorite pieces are your exquisite butterflies. They represent your work very well and are a reoccurring theme in your collections. Do you have a favorite piece that you consider your greatest achievement?


W.C: Underneath the sugar-coated idea – “greatest achievement”, you can only find stumbling blocks. I do not have anything that I can call my “greatest achievement”, but I am happy to share with you a creation that I have recently completed. This creation has been on my mind for more than a decade, until about 4 or 5 years ago, I started to have it realized. In the process of creation, I went through tons of struggles and was often close to giving it up, but I couldn’t help continuing. Finally, it was completed right before the 27th Biennale des Antiquaires.

The Wallace Chan "Secret Abyss" necklace has a yellow diamond of 10.05 cts set in a rutilated quartz shell of 211.74ct and complemented with emeralds, fancy colored diamonds, amethysts and rutilated quartz.

The Wallace Chan “Secret Abyss” necklace has a yellow diamond of 10.05 cts set in a rutilated quartz shell of 211.74ct and complemented with emeralds, fancy colored diamonds, amethysts and rutilated quartz.

This creation is titled “Secret Abyss”; it expresses my exploration on the meaning of existence.

More than 10 years ago, I saw a magician trying to escape from a glass tank of water whilst chained and handcuffed; logic said that it wasn’t possible, yet he escaped. I was moved by the performance; I was, in fact, extremely impressed. And after some years the idea of “Secret Abyss” came alive on my mind.

When you try to make an idea reality, it is often the case that a series of difficulties, sacrifices and failures tag along. I was looking for the materials for this creation, at first I thought crystal would do, but it was too clear, so it could not create the dream-like feeling I wanted. I gave up the idea of using crystal and turned to rutilated quartz instead. The texture of rutilated quartz gives the feel of a fairyland. But it is not easy to find rutilated quartz that meets the standard required for my creation, so it took a long time and great efforts.

After acquiring the suitable materials, I created a 6.5MM opening on the rutilated quartz, through this small opening my tools got in and empty the stone out. Where could I find the right tools to do this? As the creation has never been done before, naturally no one had invented the tools I needed. So it was another long process of consideration, calculation, design and experiment to have the right tools invented. I’d better not go into details here.

After a series of failures and tons of broken materials, I finally found a way to empty the stone out in a satisfying state. The 43MM wide space inside the stone became my creative space. My tools entered the space through the 6.5MM opening, and gemstone clouds were set. I would say that the 6.5MM opening was the entrance and exit of my soul, it extended my existence. Inside the rutilated quartz there was this metaphysical world, in which there were materials. What is empty is no longer empty, the clouds float in light and colors… – that denotes a state of mind, as well as a state of life.

T.B.N: What do you enjoy most about your career? What advice would you give to aspiring designers and business owners?


W.C: Accessories have existed in human history for a long, long time. It appeared way earlier than other forms of art. It is an ancient culture, and this culture has then become evidence of civilization, and an embodiment of knowledge aesthetics, wisdom and emotions. And my greatest enjoyment is to express emotions, wisdom of our ancestors and the greatness of Mother Nature through jewelry creation. Jewelry stands for eternity, and through this eternal media I can share the stories and meanings of life with others.

Designer and creator are different, and they are different from merchant or dealer. Very often, designers come up with ideas and sketches, and then they hand over their ideas and sketches to craftsmen to work on. However, I encourage designers who are interested in the jewelry field to learn with patience, and to train up their ability to reach out to all directions – on the top there is culture, philosophy and art, beneath these there is knowledge of a craftsman that includes optics, physics, ergonomics, metallurgy etc., on the left you find technology, and on the right there are trends and markets… The mastery of all allows greater creative freedom.

I am not very good at commercial activities, certainly not an expert in business. But I believe that as a merchant, dealer or investor of this field, it is important to acquire thorough knowledge of the field in order to recognize the talents of a creator. Designers and creators live in their own worlds, their pursuits tend to be more spiritual, but merchants live in a collective world, and economic growth is their fundamental consideration. But the former and the latter join hands to create the many legends we have seen in this industry.

T.B.N: Your pieces are considered to be works of art in their own right, and I would certainly agree that they are extraordinarily beautiful yet delicate and complex. Was that always the goal when you were designing your first pieces?


Wallace Chan “Fleur de la Dynastie Tang” brooch with rubies, yellow diamonds, pink sapphires, tsavorites, garnets, emeralds and diamonds.


Featuring the world’s largest flawless purple sapphire weighing 164.39ct this is the “Gabriella Rose” necklace symbolizing femininity, harmony and tranquility.


W.C: If I must define the goal of my creation, it is the true, the good and the beautiful. When I feel that my creations are far from meeting the standard, that is when I have to destroy them and start over, or I may put them aside for a period of time, and try to enhance and enliven the knowledge on my mind. My creations come alive when I enter a new world of thinking.

I have this very strong belief in my life: only when I have my work done to perfection today can my dreams be realized tomorrow. I maintain the same attitude towards any goals, dreams, obstacles and challenges in my life. It is fair to say that, in life, we may not always be rewarded for our hard work, but it is always true that no pain, no gain.

The aesthetics and craftsmanship of each piece of creation is nothing but the result of hard work.

T.B.N: Lastly, what is the ultimate vision for yourself and your brand? How would you like to be remembered as a designer?

W.C: I enjoy living for the moment, spending every second and every minute on creation. History is vast, and deep, the universe is wide, and limitless, and our existence is so small. I look at the world with the curious eyes of a child. I have to seize the moment, practice on and do my homework. Once I have completed a piece of work, I must move on to something new right away, as I cannot linger in the satisfaction that belongs only to the past. I hope that with my creations I can fulfill my responsibility for history, and I leave it to history to grade my performance.

It was great honor to be given the chance to interview Mr Chan. His passion, seemingly endless creativity and respect for his art only fuels my own career goals. He is, in my eyes the true definition of the word “Craftsman” using his various skills and experience to create one of kind, sublimely beautiful and timeless works of art.

Special thanks to the Atelier of Mr Wallace Chan.


Nouveau Spotlight: The 26th Annual International Fine Art & Antique Show

Posted in Nouveau Spotlight with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2014 by James Field


“I adore wearing gems, but not because they are mine. You can’t possess radiance, you can only admire it.”

-Elizabeth Taylor

This past weekend I had the pleasure of attending the 26th Annual International Fine Art & Antique show at the Park Avenue Armory on 67th street. Talk about a dose of awesome! This place was packed with vendors from all over the world showing off their wears, ranging from 16th century tapestries, 18th century Indian art work, swords, sculpture, and of course fine jewelry.

I was dazzled by the fine collections of Hancocks of London, Kentshire, Epoque Fine Jewels, and so many more. To see the mesmerizing array of diamonds, emeralds, rubies, sapphires and the like up close was truly a treat and a major inspiration for my work. One of my greatest goals is to become a fine jewelry designer and dealer, and by taking in the sights such as this show, my passion only grows.

Some of the highlights for me were the incredibly detailed and delicate vintage jewelry pieces from the house’s of Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Schumberger for Tiffany’s & Co.





Hey that’s me looking creepy lol


I enjoyed playing the game of “Guess what gem this is” with many of the vendors and was even allowed to try on a few pieces. Whenever I am around people that are knowledgeable in something that I wish to become knowledgeable in, I almost always ask as many questions as possible. Its a great way to learn, memorize and draw inspiration when visiting exhibitions, trade shows etc.


I adore these floral brooches of rubies, diamonds and sapphires, one of which (the bottom left blue carnation) belonged to the famous fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli!


Ancient Egyptian Semi Precious Stone Necklaces







I had a wonderful time and I wish to thank the lovely vendors and staff who made my trip such a special one.

I would also like to thank Natalie from Jewels du Jour for the tickets, thank you so much!

If you wish to check out the show, it will be at the Park Avenue Armory at 67th Street until Oct 23rd.

Visit Jewels du Jour they are giving a way a limited amount of free tickets!

Thank you all for reading.